Fine Arts Pursuits & Visual Exploration

Fine Arts Pursuits & Visual Exploration

Fine Arts Pursuits & Visual Exploration

Fine Arts Pursuits & Visual Exploration

Fine Arts Pursuits & Visual Exploration

PAINTING | LETTERPRESS | EXPERIMENTATION

PAINTING | LETTERPRESS | EXPERIMENTATION

PAINTING | LETTERPRESS | EXPERIMENTATION

PAINTING | LETTERPRESS | EXPERIMENTATION

PAINTING | LETTERPRESS | EXPERIMENTATION

My appreciation of hands-on image-making by using non-digital processes like letterpress and watercolor painting has given me a keen eye for detail in my digital design. Also, knowledge of traditional printing methods + techniques and their affects on various paper stock allows me to make sure that digital replicas are convincing. 

My appreciation of hands-on image-making by using non-digital processes like letterpress and watercolor painting has given me a keen eye for detail in my digital design. Also, knowledge of traditional printing methods + techniques and their affects on various paper stock allows me to make sure that digital replicas are convincing. 

My appreciation of hands-on image-making by using non-digital processes like letterpress and watercolor painting has given me a keen eye for detail in my digital design. Also, knowledge of traditional printing methods + techniques and their affects on various paper stock allows me to make sure that digital replicas are convincing. 

My appreciation of hands-on image-making by using non-digital processes like letterpress and watercolor painting has given me a keen eye for detail in my digital design. Also, knowledge of traditional printing methods + techniques and their affects on various paper stock allows me to make sure that digital replicas are convincing. 

My appreciation of hands-on image-making by using non-digital processes like letterpress and watercolor painting has given me a keen eye for detail in my digital design. Also, knowledge of traditional printing methods + techniques and their affects on various paper stock allows me to make sure that digital replicas are convincing. 

Watercolor & Gouache

Watercolor & Gouache

Watercolor & Gouache

Watercolor & Gouache

CLIENT: Self-initiated
TITLE: “Transparency” &
“Mountain”
Palazzo del Gatto Artist Residency,
Casaprota, Italy


MEDIUM: Watercolor, Gouache
& Graphite

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Transparency”
Palazzo del Gatto Artist Residency,
Casaprota, Italy


MEDIUM: Watercolor and Gouache

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Transparency”
Palazzo del Gatto Artist Residency,
Casaprota, Italy


MEDIUM: Watercolor and Gouache

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Transparency”
Palazzo del Gatto Artist Residency,
Casaprota, Italy


MEDIUM: Watercolor and Gouache

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Transparency”
Palazzo del Gatto Artist Residency,
Casaprota, Italy


MEDIUM: Watercolor and Gouache

Description: A continuation of a previous series dealing with color inventory. This time the idea of color inventory is blended with the background landscape. I wanted to blur the two elements so that they worked as shock style camouf lage. This direction led to further works that obscurred the background landscape with geometric shapes. The kind of shape was dictated by the landscape theme. The pieces refer to tertiary topics that will be made into further series’ on abstraction, how a painting is viewed, familiarity, culture and travel.

Description: An adaptation of a previous series where this time the idea of color inventory is blended with the background landscape. I wanted to blur the two elements so that they worked as camof lage. This idea led to further works that def ined elements of the background scene.

Description: An adaptation of a previous series where this time the idea of color inventory is blended with the background landscape. I wanted to blur the two elements so that they worked as camof lage. This idea led to further works that def ined elements of the background scene.

Description: An adaptation of a previous series where this time the idea of color inventory is blended with the background landscape. I wanted to blur the two elements so that they worked as camof lage. This idea led to further works that def ined elements of the background scene.

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Foreground & Background”
& “Frammenti.”
Palazzo del Gatto Artist Residency, Casaprota, Italy


MEDIUM: Watercolor and Gouache

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Foreground & Background”
Palazzo del Gatto Artist Residency,
Casaprota, Italy


MEDIUM: Watercolor and Gouache

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Foreground & Background”
Palazzo del Gatto Artist Residency,
Casaprota, Italy


MEDIUM: Watercolor and Gouache

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Foreground & Background”
Palazzo del Gatto Artist Residency,
Casaprota, Italy


MEDIUM: Watercolor and Gouache

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Foreground & Background”
Palazzo del Gatto Artist Residency,
Casaprota, Italy


MEDIUM: Watercolor and Gouache

Description: Another month-long artist residency in Italy where I continued the exploration of watercolor landscape painting as a means of describing foreground and background. I was living in Saudi Arabia and very curious about the women who cover their faces, how they see through the fabric when out in public. It took on new meaning to me, a foreigner in a culture very different than my own. The ability to “see” was a metaphor for me being able to really understand this new place where I lived. The surface takes control over the painting and it is only when you back up that you realize there is another scene, an environement.

A secondary challenge that I brought into this painting was to experiement with the very thing I have Design Foundation students do, blending each of the colors from corner to corner. In the end, this piece is packed with visual movement and discovery. It is the start of a forthcoming series.

Description: Another  month-long artist residency in Italy where I continued the exploration of watercolor landscape painting as a means of describing foreground and background. I was living in Saudi Arabia and very curious about the women who cover their faces, having to look through the fabric when out in public. The surface talks about outer-most layer and the underpainting is a road that you can only see if you back up. Additionally, I wanted to blend all four corners of colors as an extension of the previous color theory pieces.

Description: Another  month-long artist residency in Italy where I continued the exploration of watercolor landscape painting as a means of describing foreground and background. I was living in Saudi Arabia and very curious about the women who cover their faces, having to look through the fabric when out in public. The surface talks about outer-most layer and the underpainting is a road that you can only see if you back up. Additionally, I wanted to blend all four corners of colors as an extension of the previous color theory pieces.

Description: Another  month-long artist residency in Italy where I continued the exploration of watercolor landscape painting as a means of describing foreground and background. I was living in Saudi Arabia and very curious about the women who cover their faces, having to look through the fabric when out in public. The surface talks about outer-most layer and the underpainting is a road that you can only see if you back up. Additionally, I wanted to blend all four corners of colors as an extension of the previous color theory pieces.

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Color Inventory 1 & 2”
Anversa Artist Residency,
Anversa Degli Abruzzi, Italy


MEDIUM: Watercolor and Gouache

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Color Inventory 1 & 2”
Anversa Artist Residency,
Anversa Degli Abruzzi, Italy


MEDIUM: Watercolor and Gouache

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Color Inventory 1 & 2” Anversa Artist Residency,
Anversa Degli Abruzzi, Italy


MEDIUM: Watercolor and Gouache

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Color Inventory 1 & 2”
Anversa Artist Residency,
Anversa Degli Abruzzi, Italy


MEDIUM: Watercolor and Gouache

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Color Inventory 1 & 2”
Anversa Artist Residency,
Anversa Degli Abruzzi, Italy


MEDIUM: Watercolor and Gouache

Description: I was awarded a month-long artist residency in Central Italy where I began exploring watercolor landscape painting as a means of describing color in nature. I had just f inished teaching a semester of Color Theory where students looked at and inventoried colors found in images that they photographed. I used this to create my own version with watercolor. The above series breaks up the images into color percentages. These two paintings were also the start of more paintings that deal with concepts of seeing.

Description: I was awarded a month-long artist residency in Central Italy where I began exploring watercolor landscape painting as a means of describing color in nature. I had just f inished teaching a semester of Color Theory where students looked at and inventoried colors found in images that they photographed. I used this to create my own version with watercolor. The above series breaks up the images into color percentages. These two paintings were also the start of more paintings that deal with concepts of seeing.

Description: I was awarded a month-long artist residency in Central Italy where I began exploring watercolor landscape painting as a means of describing color in nature. I had just f inished teaching a semester of Color Theory where students looked at and inventoried colors found in images that they photographed. I used this to create my own version with watercolor. The above series breaks up the images into color percentages. These two paintings were also the start of more paintings that deal with concepts of seeing.

Description: I was awarded a month-long artist residency in Central Italy where I began exploring watercolor landscape painting as a means of describing color in nature. I had just f inished teaching a semester of Color Theory where students looked at and inventoried colors found in images that they photographed. I used this to create my own version with watercolor. The above series breaks up the images into color percentages. These two paintings were also the start of more paintings that deal with concepts of seeing.

Letterpress & Woodtype

Letterpress & Woodtype

Letterpress & Woodtype

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Birds of a Feather”
Letterpress poster, Hamilton Woodtype
Museum, Two Rivers, WI USA


MEDIUM: Letterpress


CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Birds of a Feather”
Letterpress poster, Hamilton Woodtype
Museum, Two Rivers, WI USA


MEDIUM: Letterpress


CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Birds of a Feather”
Letterpress poster, Hamilton Woodtype
Museum, Two Rivers, WI USA


MEDIUM: Letterpress


CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Birds of a Feather”
Letterpress poster, Hamilton Woodtype
Museum, Two Rivers, WI USA


MEDIUM: Letterpress


CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: “Birds of a Feather”
Letterpress poster, Hamilton Woodtype
Museum, Two Rivers, WI USA


MEDIUM: Letterpress


Description: This piece was created using mixed wooden type in various styles and sizes. The words “Birds of a Feather,” are visually explained through the use of woodtype. I used three san serif, condensed capital “T’s,” to represent telephone poles and allowed the individual letters to represent birds lighting on the wires. The challenge with this is the fact that it is not easy to create uneven spaces due to letterpress being created to deal primarily with horizontal and vertical columns of type.

Description: This piece was created using mixed wooden type in various styles and sizes. The words “Birds of a Feather,” are visually explained through the use of woodtype. I used three san serif, condensed capital “T’s,” to represent telephone poles and allowed the individual letters to represent birds lighting on the wires. The challenge with this is the fact that it is not easy to create uneven spaces due to letterpress being created to deal primarily with horizontal and vertical columns of type.

Description: This piece was created using mixed wooden type in various styles and sizes. The words “Birds of a Feather,” are visually explained through the use of woodtype. I used three san serif, condensed capital “T’s,” to represent telephone poles and allowed the individual letters to represent birds lighting on the wires. The challenge with this is the fact that it is not easy to create uneven spaces due to letterpress being created to deal primarily with horizontal and vertical columns of type.

Description: This piece was created using mixed wooden type in various styles and sizes. The words “Birds of a Feather,” are visually explained through the use of woodtype. I used three san serif, condensed capital “T’s,” to represent telephone poles and allowed the individual letters to represent birds lighting on the wires. The challenge with this is the fact that it is not easy to create uneven spaces due to letterpress being created to deal primarily with horizontal and vertical columns of type.

Description: This piece was created using mixed wooden type in various styles and sizes. The words “Birds of a Feather,” are visually explained through the use of woodtype. I used three san serif, condensed capital “T’s,” to represent telephone poles and allowed the individual letters to represent birds lighting on the wires. The challenge with this is the fact that it is not easy to create uneven spaces due to letterpress being created to deal primarily with horizontal and vertical columns of type.

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: Letterpress poster series,
Hamilton Woodtype Museum,
Two Rivers, WI  USA


MEDIUM: Letterpress


CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: Letterpress poster series,
Hamilton Woodtype Museum,
Two Rivers, WI  USA


MEDIUM: Letterpress


CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: Letterpress poster series,
Hamilton Woodtype Museum,
Two Rivers, WI  USA


MEDIUM: Letterpress


CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: Letterpress poster series,
Hamilton Woodtype Museum,
Two Rivers, WI  USA


MEDIUM: Letterpress


CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: Letterpress poster series,
Hamilton Woodtype Museum,
Two Rivers, WI  USA


MEDIUM: Letterpress


Description: These pieces were completed at Hamilton Wood Type Museum in Two Rivers, Wisconsin during a week-long artist-in-residency using vintage presses, wood type, custom-mixed inks, and re-purposed commercial plates. The topic of time and memory is intrinsic to these works through the use of letterpress printing — the resulting handmade aesthetic refers to a time prior to digital technology. Letterpress printing exposes the process where imperfections are proof of the human hand. At the museum, I found a dusty stack of vintage County Fair printing plates used to promote various aspects of county fairs. They were hand-carved from large slabs of oak. I repurposed the existing imagery subverting from the original intent rearranging them to reinterpret and abstract towards a more of artistic result. I used custom-mixed inks and hand brayer to control color for  added painterly effects. The longer I worked with these plates, the more I wanted to communicate the charm of this history; an era known for its hard work and innocence. Although it may not be my memory conveyed by the end results, I did intend to create an ethereal glimpse into a past time of simplicity. I wanted to avoid anything literal by using snippets of recognizable parts to suggest a narrativem derived by the viewer.

Description: These pieces were completed at Hamilton Wood Type Museum in Two Rivers, Wisconsin during a week-long artist-in-residency using vintage presses, wood type, custom-mixed inks, and re-purposed commercial plates. The topic of time and memory is intrinsic to these works through the use of letterpress printing — the resulting handmade aesthetic refers to a time prior to digital technology. Letterpress printing exposes the process where imperfections are proof of the human hand. At the museum, I found a dusty stack of vintage County Fair printing plates used to promote various aspects of county fairs. They were hand-carved from large slabs of oak. I repurposed the existing imagery subverting from the original intent rearranging them to reinterpret and abstract towards a more of artistic result. I used custom-mixed inks and hand brayer to control color for  added painterly effects. The longer I worked with these plates, the more I wanted to communicate the charm of this history; an era known for its hard work and innocence. Although it may not be my memory conveyed by the end results, I did intend to create an ethereal glimpse into a past time of simplicity. I wanted to avoid anything literal by using snippets of recognizable parts to suggest a narrativem derived by the viewer.

Description: These pieces were completed at Hamilton Wood Type Museum in Two Rivers, Wisconsin during a week-long artist-in-residency using vintage presses, wood type, custom-mixed inks, and re-purposed commercial plates. The topic of time and memory is intrinsic to these works through the use of letterpress printing — the resulting handmade aesthetic refers to a time prior to digital technology. Letterpress printing exposes the process where imperfections are proof of the human hand. At the museum, I found a dusty stack of vintage County Fair printing plates used to promote various aspects of county fairs. They were hand-carved from large slabs of oak. I repurposed the existing imagery subverting from the original intent rearranging them to reinterpret and abstract towards a more of artistic result. I used custom-mixed inks and hand brayer to control color for  added painterly effects. The longer I worked with these plates, the more I wanted to communicate the charm of this history; an era known for its hard work and innocence. Although it may not be my memory conveyed by the end results, I did intend to create an ethereal glimpse into a past time of simplicity. I wanted to avoid anything literal by using snippets of recognizable parts to suggest a narrativem derived by the viewer.

Description: These pieces were completed at Hamilton Wood Type Museum in Two Rivers, Wisconsin during a week-long artist-in-residency using vintage presses, wood type, custom-mixed inks, and re-purposed commercial plates. The topic of time and memory is intrinsic to these works through the use of letterpress printing — the resulting handmade aesthetic refers to a time prior to digital technology. Letterpress printing exposes the process where imperfections are proof of the human hand. At the museum, I found a dusty stack of vintage County Fair printing plates used to promote various aspects of county fairs. They were hand-carved from large slabs of oak. I repurposed the existing imagery subverting from the original intent rearranging them to reinterpret and abstract towards a more of artistic result. I used custom-mixed inks and hand brayer to control color for  added painterly effects. The longer I worked with these plates, the more I wanted to communicate the charm of this history; an era known for its hard work and innocence. Although it may not be my memory conveyed by the end results, I did intend to create an ethereal glimpse into a past time of simplicity. I wanted to avoid anything literal by using snippets of recognizable parts to suggest a narrativem derived by the viewer.

Description: These pieces were completed at Hamilton Wood Type Museum in Two Rivers, Wisconsin during a week-long artist-in-residency using vintage presses, wood type, custom-mixed inks, and re-purposed commercial plates. The topic of time and memory is intrinsic to these works through the use of letterpress printing — the resulting handmade aesthetic refers to a time prior to digital technology. Letterpress printing exposes the process where imperfections are proof of the human hand. At the museum, I found a dusty stack of vintage County Fair printing plates used to promote various aspects of county fairs. They were hand-carved from large slabs of oak. I repurposed the existing imagery subverting from the original intent rearranging them to reinterpret and abstract towards a more of artistic result. I used custom-mixed inks and hand brayer to control color for  added painterly effects. The longer I worked with these plates, the more I wanted to communicate the charm of this history; an era known for its hard work and innocence. Although it may not be my memory conveyed by the end results, I did intend to create an ethereal glimpse into a past time of simplicity. I wanted to avoid anything literal by using snippets of recognizable parts to suggest a narrativem derived by the viewer.

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: Letterpress experiments,
Hamilton Woodtype Museum,
Two Rivers, WI  USA


MEDIUM: Letterpress

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: Letterpress experiments,
Hamilton Woodtype Museum, Two Rivers, WI  USA


MEDIUM: Letterpress

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: Letterpress experiments,
Hamilton Woodtype Museum, Two Rivers, WI  USA


MEDIUM: Letterpress

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: Letterpress experiments,
Hamilton Woodtype Museum, Two Rivers, WI  USA


MEDIUM: Letterpress

CLIENT: Self-initiated
PROJECT: Letterpress experiments,
Hamilton Woodtype Museum, Two Rivers, WI  USA


MEDIUM: Letterpress

About: These two pieces were completed at Hamilton Wood Type Museum in Two Rivers, Wisconsin during a week-long artist-in-residency using vintage presses, wood and lead type with custom-mixed inks.

Concept: The museum accepts miscellaneous donations of wood and metal type from everywhere. Much of the donated sets are incomplete or come with metal images.

The large poster of the number 2 was created as homage to the woodtype museum. The prominent feature was a huge, wooden character of a 2. The large number had a warp in the wood which I liked because it was so dramatic. The large number printed over the initial pass where I embossed small logos and glyphs of items having to do with Two Rivers (beer bottles, cheese, the shape of the state, etc.). The metal illustration was pressed into the soft paper leaving an indent in the form of the images and then when the solid form of the number 2 was letter-pressed over, the images showed.

The second piece explored lead decorative elements (sorts) which I rearranged into an artistic narrative.

About: These two pieces were completed at Hamilton Wood Type Museum in Two Rivers, Wisconsin during a week-long artist-in-residency using vintage presses, wood and lead type with custom-mixed inks.

Concept: The museum accepts miscellaneous donations of wood and metal type from everywhere. Much of the donated sets are incomplete or come with metal images.

The large poster of the number 2 was created as homage to the woodtype museum. The prominent feature was a huge, wooden character of a 2. The large number had a warp in the wood which I liked because it was so dramatic. The large number printed over the initial pass where I embossed small logos and glyphs of items having to do with Two Rivers (beer bottles, cheese, the shape of the state, etc.). The metal illustration was pressed into the soft paper leaving an indent in the form of the images and then when the solid form of the number 2 was letter-pressed over, the images showed.

The second piece explored lead decorative elements (sorts) which I rearranged into an artistic narrative.

About: These two pieces were completed at Hamilton Wood Type Museum in Two Rivers, Wisconsin during a week-long artist-in-residency using vintage presses, wood and lead type with custom-mixed inks.

Concept: The museum accepts miscellaneous donations of wood and metal type from everywhere. Much of the donated sets are incomplete or come with metal images.

The large poster of the number 2 was created as homage to the woodtype museum. The prominent feature was a huge, wooden character of a 2. The large number had a warp in the wood which I liked because it was so dramatic. The large number printed over the initial pass where I embossed small logos and glyphs of items having to do with Two Rivers (beer bottles, cheese, the shape of the state, etc.). The metal illustration was pressed into the soft paper leaving an indent in the form of the images and then when the solid form of the number 2 was letter-pressed over, the images showed.

The second piece explored lead decorative elements (sorts) which I rearranged into an artistic narrative.

About: These two pieces were completed at Hamilton Wood Type Museum in Two Rivers, Wisconsin during a week-long artist-in-residency using vintage presses, wood and lead type with custom-mixed inks.

Concept: The museum accepts miscellaneous donations of wood and metal type from everywhere. Much of the donated sets are incomplete or come with metal images.

The large poster of the number 2 was created as homage to the woodtype museum. The prominent feature was a huge, wooden character of a 2. The large number had a warp in the wood which I liked because it was so dramatic. The large number printed over the initial pass where I embossed small logos and glyphs of items having to do with Two Rivers (beer bottles, cheese, the shape of the state, etc.). The metal illustration was pressed into the soft paper leaving an indent in the form of the images and then when the solid form of the number 2 was letter-pressed over, the images showed.

The second piece explored lead decorative elements (sorts) which I rearranged into an artistic narrative.

About: These two pieces were completed at Hamilton Wood Type Museum in Two Rivers, Wisconsin during a week-long artist-in-residency using vintage presses, wood and lead type with custom-mixed inks.

Concept: The museum accepts miscellaneous donations of wood and metal type from everywhere. Much of the donated sets are incomplete or come with metal images.

The large poster of the number 2 was created as homage to the woodtype museum. The prominent feature was a huge, wooden character of a 2. The large number had a warp in the wood which I liked because it was so dramatic. The large number printed over the initial pass where I embossed small logos and glyphs of items having to do with Two Rivers (beer bottles, cheese, the shape of the state, etc.). The metal illustration was pressed into the soft paper leaving an indent in the form of the images and then when the solid form of the number 2 was letter-pressed over, the images showed.

The second piece explored lead decorative elements (sorts) which I rearranged into an artistic narrative.

THE WORLD IS FULL OF ORDINARY VISUAL DESIGN, WHY NOT EMBRACE THE UNEXPECTED?

THE WORLD IS FULL OF ORDINARY VISUAL DESIGN, WHY NOT EMBRACE THE UNEXPECTED?

THE WORLD IS FULL OF ORDINARY VISUAL DESIGN, WHY NOT EMBRACE THE UNEXPECTED?

THE WORLD IS FULL OF ORDINARY VISUAL DESIGN, WHY NOT EMBRACE THE UNEXPECTED?

THE WORLD IS FULL OF ORDINARY VISUAL DESIGN, WHY NOT EMBRACE THE UNEXPECTED?

Say hello! Like something you saw? Want to comment? Interested in doing business? Drop me a line at emilieburnham@me.com

Say hello! Like something you saw? Want to comment? Interested in doing business? Drop me a line at emilieburnham@me.com

Say hello! Like something you saw? Want to comment? Interested in doing business? Drop me a line at emilieburnham@me.com

Say hello! Like something you saw? Want to comment? Interested in doing business? Drop me a line at emilieburnham@me.com

Say hello! Like something you saw? Want to comment? Interested in doing business? Drop me a line at emilieburnham@me.com

@2019 Emilie Burnham

@2019 Emilie Burnham

@2019 Emilie Burnham

@2019 Emilie Burnham